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Eva Baranovicova,Ema Kantorova,Dagmar Kalenska,Lucia Lichardusova,Michal Bittsan- sky,Dusan Dobrota.Journal of Biomedical Research,2017,31(4):301-305
Thalamic paramagnetic iron by T2* relaxometry correlates with severity of multiple sclerosis
Received:February 15, 2016  Revised:August 03, 2016
DOI10.7555/JBR.31.20160023
Keywordsmultiple sclerosis, thalamus, iron, relaxometry
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AuthorInstitution
Eva Baranovicova Biomedical Centre BioMed, Division of Neuroscience, Jessenius Faculty of Medicine, Comenius University in Bratislava, Mala Hora 4, 03601 Martin, Slovakia
Ema Kantorova Neurology Clinic, Jessenius Faculty of Medicine, Comenius University in Bratislava, Kollarova 2, 03601 Martin, Slovakia
Dagmar Kalenska Department of Medical Biochemistry, Jessenius Faculty of Medicine, Comenius University in Bratislava, Mala Hora 4, 03601 Martin, Slovakia
Lucia Lichardusova Biomedical Centre BioMed, Division of Neuroscience, Jessenius Faculty of Medicine, Comenius University in Bratislava, Mala Hora 4, 03601 Martin, Slovakia
Michal Bittsan- sky Biomedical Centre BioMed, Division of Neuroscience, Jessenius Faculty of Medicine, Comenius University in Bratislava, Mala Hora 4, 03601 Martin, Slovakia
Dusan Dobrota Department of Medical Biochemistry, Jessenius Faculty of Medicine, Comenius University in Bratislava, Mala Hora 4, 03601 Martin, Slovakia
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Abstract
      Iron can contribute to the pathogenesis and progression of multiple sclerosis (MS) due to its accumulation in the human brain. We focus on the thalamus as an information transmitter between various subcortical and cortical areas. Thalamic iron seems to follow different rules than iron in other deep gray matter structures and its relation to the clinical outcomes of MS is still indistinct. In our study, we investigated a connection between thalamic iron and patients' disability and course of the disease. The presence of paramagnetic substances in the tissues was tracked by T2* quantification. Twenty-eight subjects with definite MS and 15 age-matched healthy controls underwent MRI examination with a focus on gradient echo sequence. We observed a non-monotonous course of T2* values with age in healthy controls. Furthermore, T2* distribution in MS patients was significantly wider than that of age matched healthy volunteers (P < 0.001). A strong significant correlation was demonstrated between T2* distribution spread and the expanded disability status scale (EDSS) (left thalamus: P<0.00005; right thalamus: P<0.005), and multiple sclerosis severity scale (MSSS) (left thalamus: P <0.05; right thalamus: P <0.005). The paramagnetic iron distribution in the thalamus in MS was not uniform and this inhomogeneity may be considered as an indicator of thalamic neurodegeneration in MS.
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